AG Rural News

At the recent BIO World Congress in Des Moines, we received an update on the growth of the U.S. biobased products industry from Kate Lewis, deputy program manager for USDA’s BioPreferred Program. AUDIO: Kate Lewis Continue reading Strong growth in the biobased products industry at Brownfield Ag News.
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The Spring of 2019 will be remembered as a historic year for rainfall as well as late planting. Years with similar weather, that also resulted in late planting (2013, 1995, 1993 and 1984), saw national yields that were well below pre-planting expectations. The grain markets have rallied and prices have improved. UMB Bank’s Lance Albin says this could be a “black swan” type of event where markets might move considerably higher even from where we are today. Continue reading A rising price environment at Brownfield Ag News.
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Ag News

U.S. ethanol production and stocks declined last week. The U.S. Energy Information Administration says production averaged 1.023 million barrels a day, down 22,000 on the week, the lowest weekly average since April as the industry struggles with margins and EPA policy on exemption waivers for smaller oil refiners. Most of the weekly decline was in the Midwestern reporting region. Stocks were down 516,000 barrels on the week at 23.367 million. Continue reading Ethanol production hits multi-month low at Brownfield Ag News.
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The nation’s biggest ethanol producer, POET, is cutting back on production. POET says it will idle its Cloverdale, Indiana plant and reduce output at half of its other facilities, with the largest drops taking place in Iowa and Ohio. The company says the production cutback will reduce its corn demand by 130 million bushels annually. POET chairman and CEO Jeff Broin says the move was prompted by recent decisions by the Trump Administration regarding RFS Small Refinery Exemptions. Continue reading POET is cutting ethanol production; blames ‘oil bailouts’ at Brownfield Ag News.
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A Missouri cattleman met with Congresswoman Vicky Hartzler on her farm tour to express concern about the effects on the cattle market from the Kansas beef plant fire. Ron McBee has a 600 cow/calf operation in central Missouri, near Fayette, “My theory is that we could do without a lot of the government welfare if we had a more level playing field in the cattle business. Directly, the next week after the fire feeder cattle went down 20-cents, Choice cattle went up $9.00 so the packer makes all the money instead of spreading it out. Continue reading Cattlemen tell Hartzler their price concerns...
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The USDA’s condition ratings for corn and soybeans dipped slightly last week. After a too wet start to the planting season, development conditions have turned too dry in some key U.S. growing areas. As of Sunday, 95% of U.S. corn is silking, compared to the five-year average of 99%, with 55% at the dough making stage, compared to 76% on average, and 15% has dented, half of the typical pace. 56% of the crop is rated good to excellent, down 1% on the week and 12% below a year ago. Continue reading USDA: U.S. corn, soybean ratings both down 1% at Brownfield...
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